US President Joe Biden visits South Korea and Japan on high-stakes trip

0

Welcome to today’s Morning Brief, where we follow US President Joe Biden’s speech Tour in Asia, Ukraine’s first war crimes trial, and the Taliban are in progress repression on women’s rights.

If you would like to receive Morning Brief in your inbox every weekday, please sign up here.


Biden visits South Korea and Japan

Welcome to today’s Morning Brief, where we follow US President Joe Biden’s speech Tour in Asia, Ukraine’s first war crimes trial, and the Taliban are in progress repression on women’s rights.

If you would like to receive Morning Brief in your inbox every weekday, please sign up here.


Biden visits South Korea and Japan

US President Joe Biden will land in Asia today, for the first time in his presidency, kicks off a high-profile trip to strengthen ties with regional allies and launch a new trade initiative.

During the four-day tour, Biden will have a key opportunity to strengthen partnerships with South Korea and Japan and reaffirm the region’s longstanding importance to U.S. foreign policy, particularly as it relates to China.

“China fits into this as a top target, there’s really no better way to put it,” said Yun Sun, senior fellow at the Stimson Center, who noted that Beijing remains a top priority. in Washington’s national security agenda. The “United States is trying to strengthen its coordination and cooperation with its allies and partners in order to deal more effectively with China,” she said.

Biden’s first stop is Seoul, where he will meet new South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol; from there he will travel to Japan for talks with Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida. The tour will end with a Quad summit in Tokyo, bringing together Biden, Kishida, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and the winner of Saturday’s Australian election.

In Tokyo, Biden is also expected to officially unveil the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework, a new U.S.-led iinitiative which would be designed to enhance trade and supply chains In the region.

“The message we are trying to send on this trip is one of an affirmative view of what the world can look like if the democracies and open societies of the world come together to shape the rules of the road,” mentioned US National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan. “We believe this message will be heard everywhere. We think he will be heard in Beijing.

But neighboring North Korea could disrupt hopes for a smooth trip. US and South Korean officials have warned that Pyongyang could plot to carry out a nuclear attack or missile test to coincide with the tour, and Sullivan said the White House is preparing for worst-case scenarios. “We are preparing for all eventualities, including the possibility of such a provocation occurring while we are in Korea or Japan,” he said.

If Pyongyang conducted a test during the trip, it will “add another layer of urgency”, Sun said. But at the same time, she added, “a provocation by North Korea will not be a big surprise because even before the Biden administration, I think people expected North Korea to act. “.


What we follow today

Trial for war crimes in Ukraine. Vadim Shishimarin, a 21-year-old Russian soldier, has pleaded guilty to shooting and killing an unarmed Ukrainian civilian in the first war crimes trial held for Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. He faces life imprisonment, maximum phrase available in Ukraine.

The trial could be the first in a long series: Ukrainian officials are said to have already charged 10 other Russian soldiers for war crimesaccording to The Wall Street Journal.

Repression of the Taliban. The Taliban have required than female TV anchors in Afghanistan covering their faces during the presentation, the latest in a long line of restrictions targeting the rights of Afghan women. Earlier in May, the Taliban also issued a burqa mandate and required women to have male chaperones when outdoors.

“Afghanistan under the Taliban has come to mirror the fictional totalitarian society of Margaret Atwood’s 1985 dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Talein which women’s bodies are treated as the property of the state,” FP columnist Lynne O’Donnell writing.


Partygate findings. After a four-month long investigation, British authorities have finally completed their investigation into the ‘party portalgovernment meetings on Thursday. A total of 126 fines have been issued to 83 people for breaking pandemic rules on social gatherings, although British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, whose very career has been threatens when he was fined last month spared a second fine.

Historical default of Sri Lanka. As Sri Lanka grapples with growing economic and political crises, the country by default Thursday on its foreign debt. With the default – the first in Sri Lanka’s history – the country now has about $51 billion.

“As Sri Lanka’s economic disaster continues, the protests will also continue, ensuring that the political crisis is not yet over either,” Virginia Jeffries and Laxmanan Sanjeev wrote in Foreign Police yesterday. Despite immense pressure to step down, they write, Sri Lankan President Gotabaya Rajapaksa appears to be preparing for the long haul.


Condé Nast, the publishing giant behind vogue magazineapologized to a pub in Cornwall, England, just days after threatening to sue him for having a similar name to the fashion publication.

As noted by Monday’s Morning Brief, the pub – called Star Inn in Vogue—wrote a letter rejecting the publisher’s request, explaining that the pub is in a village called Vogue which is much older than the magazine while noting that singer Madonna had presumably not asked permission from the company when choosing the title of his hit song.

“When I opened the letter I thought some bugger from the village was bothering me,” said Mark Graham, the pub’s owner. Cornwall Live.

Graham hasn’t given up on poking fun at the post; according to the BBC, his potential plans include publishing a local parish magazine called Vogue Magazine, and a re-arrangement of Madonna’s Vogue, “which will be performed by ‘some of the tallest, hairiest men in the village in skimpy clothes’ at the beer festival later this year.”

To apologize, Condé Nast sent the pub a framed letter apologies. “From one Vogue to another, please accept our apologies,” the letter read.


Source link

Share.

About Author

Comments are closed.